PILLCAM

PILLCAM TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT IS CURRENTLY UNDERWAY

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SUPPORTED BY THE BRITISH SOCIETY FOR IMMUNOLOGY, IN COLLABORATION WITH THE IMMUNOLOGY GROUP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER AND THE GI PHYSIOLOGY DEPARTMENT AT SALFORD ROYAL HOSPITAL.

UPDATES COMING SOON.

PREVIOUS RESEARCH

Mellissa was shown the imaging science labs at the University of Manchester by PhD student James O'Sullivan, they started off with the imaging of a liver sample in a tomograph a.k.a. X-ray scanner (called a Nikon XTH). The basic principle is that by taking lots of pictures (projections) of the sample from different angles, you can “reconstruct” a 3D image on a computer, allowing you to see inside the sample without tampering with it. This is exactly the same process as is employed in medical CT scanners.They then had a look at some “volume rendering” (3D modelling) of a mouse gut biopsy infected with the whipworm Trichuris muris. There was also the video of the liver blood vessels and the sinogram (a 2D tornado-like representation of the projections called a “radon transform” from which the 3D data is reconstructed).

James O'Sullivan is a PhD student at the University of Manchester’s School of Materials. His studies focus on improving the imaging of biological material by refining and weaving together insights from different imaging methods, including X-ray tomography and electron microscopy. In the process, he aims to use these cutting edge techniques to better understand the life cycles and associated disorders of medically important parasites.

Mellissa was also shown by the team the process of Histology and how to make a slide with a sample of tissue culture, which is leading to new project ideas and development with using materials in a different way. Mellissa will be visiting the lab throughout the year to develop her project ideas further.